The Olympics & Clean Snacking

I’m one of those obsessed Olympics junkies.  The Olympics thrill me, summer or winter.  I have my favorite events, but I’ll watch just about any of them.  I admire anyone who pushes the edge of his or her physical and mental limits, and I’m insatiably fascinated by the drive, discipline, and focus that it takes to be an Olympian.  The Olympics showcase some of the best that the human form can achieve — strength, grace, agility, endurance.  Simply put, it is a beautiful thing to witness.

Naturally, being an equally obsessed foodie, I like to watch the Olympics alongside a table packed with snackies and in the company of friends.  Kori came over on Friday to watch the Opening Ceremonies with me and the Gent, and we assembled an enviable menu of delicious and healthful tidbits for noshing.

We dipped cherry tomatoes and wholegrain crackers into locally made, preservative-free hummus loaded with lemon, garlic, and cayenne.  We diced up a fresh zucchini and added it to the tabouleh made by our local co-op, Wheatsfield (to “vegetable it up”).  The zucchini-tabouleh tasted especially amazing piled on top of a slice of omega-3-rich dry smoked salmon.

When I do indulge in a little dairy, I love goat cheese, which is easier to digest than cheese made from cow’s milk.  We enjoyed two kinds: Cana de Cabra, a soft-ripened Spanish goat’s milk cheese, and a crumbly, salty Palhais Goat “Button” from Portugal.  I particularly liked the Cana de Cabra wedged inside a dried white Turkish fig, while the salty Palhais paired well with another Wheatfield salad, beets marinated in apple juice and topped with shredded fresh mint.

That’s actually the Cana de Cabra, not the Palhais, in this photo. Also a good combo!

Dried mango, fresh blueberries, and fresh cherries balanced the savory with a bit of sweetness.  Finally, we shared a “Righteously Raw” bar, which was the first time any of us had tried raw chocolate.  Recent research suggests that raw chocolate packs significantly more anti-inflammatory power than refined chocolate, and it certainly contains less sugar (3 grams per serving compared to refined dark chocolate’s 10 or 12 grams).

The raw chocolate had been ground with other organic, raw powders including raspberry, rose hip, and maqui berry which gave it some sweetness and a tangy, fruity kick.

The raw chocolate bar had a moist, grainy texture that was definitely different than smoother, processed chocolate bars, but sort of intriguing.  I keep thinking about the texture and flavor and find myself wanting to try it again.  Oooh yeah, I’m looking forward to another two weeks of Olympic events and champion snacking…

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This entry was posted in alliums (garlic/onions), Anti-Inflammatory Ingredients, Appetizers, berries, chile pepper, Desserts, fatty fish, herbs, legumes, Nut-free, root vegetables, Snacks, Vegetarian. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to The Olympics & Clean Snacking

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  2. sounds like an amazing gourmet spread. I also LOVE the olympics, actually we all do in this house.
    One question: Do you know if ordinary smoked salmon, purchased in the supermarket, is anti inflammatory or even good for you?

    • Yankeepants says:

      I think smoked salmon is a great source of anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids. I would just read the packaging and make sure to buy wild salmon, not farmed. The farmed stuff is so loaded with other crap that I think the bad outweighs the good (at least in the U.S.).

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